Featured Trials

As an NCI-designated cancer center, MUSC Hollings Cancer Center offers clinical trials and therapies not available elsewhere in the state. Below are some of the newest and most promising clinical trials that are currently open to patients. 

COMPPARE Prostate Cancer Trial

Dr David Marshall looks at a computer screen in an operating room

Hollings is enrolling patients in a national clinical trial to help to determine the best, most cost-effective approach for treating prostate cancer through radiation therapy. Known as the COMPPARE study, the trial will compare the quality of life, side effects and cure rates for prostate cancer patients who are treated with either photon therapy or proton therapy.

COVID-19 & Cancer Trial

Dr. David Cachia talks with another doctor 

Hollings is enrolling participants in a nationwide study to better understand the long-term outcomes of cancer patients who have also been diagnosed with COVID-19. Led by the NCI, the study is enrolling patients of all ages across all cancer subtypes in hopes of answering critical questions about how the two diseases intersect.

Prostate Cancer Trial

Dr. Michael Lilly stands in the lobby of Hollings Cancer Center 

Hollings researchers are investigating a drug that they hope will improve survival for men with advanced prostate cancer who no longer respond well to standard treatment options. This Phase II trial will also examine patients' genetic profiles to see if the drug is more effective in certain men.

Pancreatic Cancer Trial

Dr. Thor Johnson 

In this Phase III trial, Hollings researchers are testing a new targeted approach for delivering chemotherapy to patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer in hopes that it will be more effective in shrinking and stabilizing certain types of tumors. Previous safety trials found that median survival rates nearly doubled from 14 months to 28 months.

Lymphoma Trial 

Dr. Brian Greenwell stands outside in a garden with a stethoscope around his neck 

This Phase II clinical trial will examine the safety and efficacy of a new combination of drugs for treating mantle cell lymphoma, a rare form of lymphoma that is most commonly found in older adults. Hollings researchers hope the drug combination will prolong remission for patients with this rare disease.